Monday, July 23, 2012

Who Haven't You Read But Should


Phil's lilies smell like cinnamon. Gorgeous.




I remember my mother telling me that I wouldn't like Mickey Spillane. For some reason that piece of advice stayed with me and I have never read him.

Who haven't you read?

31 comments:

Chris said...

I haven't read Spillane either. Or Chandler.

Todd Mason said...

Thackeray. Or so I assume. Galsworthy, as noted recently. I've been meaning to get around to Ian Rankin.

Prashant C. Trikannad said...

Heavyweights Tolstoy, Shakespeare, Dostoevsky, Tolkien, and Nietzsche (I have started reading the last mentioned). I have also been meaning to read Kazantzakis' "The Last Temptation," once banned in India, and "Zorba the Greek."

Deb said...

For every writer I've read, there are ten I haven't. The name that jumps out first is Dennis Lahane. I have a couple of his books in the tbr pile and one day I hope I'll get around to reading them.

Jerry House said...

So many authors I'm embarassed to mention them, including many of the classics that people say they have read but haven't. (Although when I was a kid, I burned my way through the Classic Comics series. That should count for something.)

Of today's authors my most glaring ommissions are George Pelecanos and John Scalzi. Although I'm a great Geroge R. R. Martin fan, I haven't started SONG OF FIRE AND ICE.

pattinase (abbott) said...

No Galsworthy, no Trollope.
I was nearly fired from a job for reading THE LAST TEMPTATION OF CHRIST on a break. My boss thought it was heresy.

Prashant C. Trikannad said...

I like Trollope's prose, particularly in his autobiography.

Eric Beetner said...

Every time I've read someone I feel like I "should" it hasn't gone well. I think of Murakami as a good example. I wanted to like it, even read more than one. But sheesh, I do not go in for that at all.
I've skipped stuff like David Foster Wallace because I just know I wouldn't like it.
When I finally got to Spillaine, I was underwhelmed.
I certainly think we get to know our own tastes enough that you can tell if something is going to be in your wheelhouse or not, but I think staying away from something just because someone else warns you about it might mean missing out. then again it may just be me not trusting any book my Mother would suggest or warn against.

Cap'n Bob said...

I don't think I've ever read Sax Rohmer or Sinclair Lewis. The only Ken Bruen I read was a collaboration he did with someone whose name escapes me.

Anonymous said...

I suppose Proust would be on the list. I've tried several times - not as many oas George perhaps - but never got into it. Also Dreiser, who I know you like, and Galsworthy, another one I've tried (Forsyte Saga) but who didn't grab me.

Others? Willa Cather, Knut Hamsen, many of the modern Scandinavian crime writers (Karin Fossum, Anne Holt, Jo Nesbo, all Norwegians), Dave Eggers, David Foster Wallace etc.

Of the ones mentioned above, Cap'n Bob you should definitely check out Bruen's Brant & Roberts books, starting with A WHITE ARREST. Trust me. Deb, you could try Lehane but...well, he's a matter of taste. prashant, I agree with you about Trollope's autobiography. Jerry, I like some of Pelecanos but definitely recommend Scalzi.

Jeff M.

George said...

I haven't read Dave Eggers yet although I have a stack of his books around here somewhere. I also have a stack of Dostoevsky but I've only read the short works, not the long ones. For some reason, I'm not a fan of Russian writers except for Chekhov.

Deb said...

In her wonderful graphic novel, Fun Home, Alison Bechtel claims that a person becomes middle-aged the day they realize they're never going to read Remembrance of Things Past.

Kent Morgan said...

Agatha Christie

Anonymous said...

I loved Fun Home, Deb. I'm waiting for her new book (Are You My Mother?).

George, I've read Crime and Punishment and a few of the shorter works. I'm not a huge fan of the Russians either, but if you haven't read it (you probably have) try Isaac Babel's stories.


Jeff M.

Charles Gramlich said...

cornel woolrich.

pattinase (abbott) said...

Woolrich is good, Charles.
Also not a big fan of the Russians. Who can keep the names straight?
Agatha Christie is amazing. I read every one in my twenties but reading them now might be a chore.
I did like the two Lehanes I read but not enough to go further.
Love the Jack Taylor books.

Anonymous said...

Woolrich's short stories are a good place to start. There are several collections out there.


Jeff M.

Richard S. Wheeler said...

Nearly all contemporary literary novels. It's like running uphill.

Dave Zeltserman said...

When I was in college and studying Russian, I was reading Tolstoy and Checkov in the original Russian, and these were truly great writers. I haven't read any of their translated works for fear that it would lose too much in translation.

Patti, do yourself a favor. Find a copy of I, the Jury. Spillane was one of the best.

pattinase (abbott) said...

That happens to be the one Spillane I have, Dave.
I just put one aside, Richard, that had rave reviews. Where is the story?

Todd Mason said...

Eggers, for all his good charitable work, is as shallow as a cookie sheet.

Sandra Scoppettone said...

Doris Lessing. Tried. Couldn't do it.

pattinase (abbott) said...

You might life one by her-The FIFTH CHILD. Certainly the Martha Quest series was difficult to wade through though.

Anonymous said...

I read THE GOLDEN NOTEBOOK but was never able to get through any of the others.


Jeff M.

Naomi Johnson said...

As a crime fiction fan it's truly embarrassing to admit I've not read Ellroy or Pelecanos -- yet. They both have books in my TBR so I have hopes.

pattinase (abbott) said...

The only Ellroy I have read is MY DARK PLACES and no Pelecanos for me. Something about his writing style puts me off. Also still haven't read Burke, Slaughter and many others.
Golden Notebook is from the Martha Quest series. I have a feeling I wouldn't stick with it today.

Ben said...

I haven't read Denis Johnson yet, but I'll soon remedy to that (have Jesus' Son in the TBR). Haven't read Charles Willeford either and it appears like I'm missing out. Looking forward to get into Sara Gran also.

pattinase (abbott) said...

My husband loved TREE OF SMOKE. I liked JESUS' SON

You must read DOPE by Gran. And COME CLOSER.

Willeford may be my favorite writer. The Hoke books are sooooo funny.

Gerard said...

I never read an AGATHA CHRISTIE novel.

StephenD said...

I'm slowly trying to fill in gaps of writers I haven't read. Case in point, I read my first Richard Stark and Lawrence Block novels this year. Who haven't I read? Goodis, Jim Thompson, Ken Bruen.

Spillane and Ellroy aren't for everyone, but you won't know until you try. I didn't like my first Pelecanos (Drama City), but thoroughly enjoyed my second (Right As Rain).

pattinase (abbott) said...

I really question whether anyone coming to Christie in 2012 would find compelling. It would have to be out of curiosity or to fill in.
Haven't read Goodis or Thompson but lots of Block.