Wednesday, September 24, 2014

Hazel Boswell's illustrations




I am going to link first here to Brian Busby's blog where you can find out more about Hazel Boswell, the Canadian woman who wrote and illustrated TOWN HOUSE, COUNTRY HOUSE and LEGENDS OF QUEBEC.

I had never heard of Ms. Boswell when I came across these pictures, signed and titled on on the matting, which you cannot see here. They were cut from her book.
There were 40 or 50 at them at a rather amazing estate sale we went to on Saturday. We were drawn to them immediately but it took us a while to realize they were from Quebec City where we just had been. It was only the picture of the Chateau Frontenac  that finally tipped us off.

We went home with 3 of them at $3 each. And then began to look into Boswell and came up with Brian Busby's piece on her on his blog from four years ago. We headed back to the sale after reading about her, determined to grab a few more.

A man was standing at the table with the remaining prints in his hands.Would he buy the 15? After losing his bid to get a good price for the 15, he took ten and we grabbed the last five.


My attic is filled with artwork. None of it valuable but all things that spoke to me. And these charming pictures spoke to me. Framing eight of them will cost a small fortune and since they are valueless, it probably isn't worth it. But I love them and am glad to have spend only $24 on something I like so much. Hazel Boswell wrote and illustrated two books--one of growing up in Montreal, the other on Montreal folk tales.

Other than books, what do you spend money on? What do you collect--or your spouse?





14 comments:

Deb said...

I would recommend looking at second-hand stores for frames for your prints. Yes, they won't be matted or on acid-free paper, but isn't that better than keeping them in the attic. I've found some great frames at Goodwill! Also, places like Michael's and Hobby Lobby have DIY framing-kits (although I hesitate to recommend Hobby Lobby since their Neanderthal attitude toward women and birth control has set us back a generation or more, healthcare-wise).

As for me, I collect all sorts of knic-knacks and jimcrackery--none of it pricey, most of it from thrift stores and garage sales: teapots, Depression-era (and reproduction) cobalt-blue glass, snow globes (a family collection--wherever we travel, we try to pick up a snow globe), fleur-de-lis (almost a fetish object down here), the list goes on--and my shelves and curio cabinets continue to be cluttered.

pattinase (abbott) said...

Yeah, I am also subject to pottery impulse buying. I have reached the point though where I am weeding out rather than bringing more in.

Margot Kinberg said...

Oh, this is terrific artwork! Thanks for sharing.

Brian Busby said...

How odd that the hunt for information led you to someone you know, Patti. The images you've posted are amongst her best, I think. Hazel Boswell is a neglected gem. I hadn't encountered her name until coming across Legends of Quebec some four summers back. This was in the province's Eastern Townships. I wonder how these ended up on your side of the border.

Well done, Patti and Phil!

George said...

I'm with Margot: terrific artwork! Diane and I buy paintings from local artists. Our latest acquisition is a Kathy Giles. You can see her gallery of artwork here: http://www.kgilesstudio.com/New%20Gallery.html

Charles Gramlich said...

Very interesting. I tend to like more fantasy/sf type art but this is pretty cool.

Anonymous said...

I really like those too, Patti. Years ago my parents went to Quebec and I remember their pictures of the Chateau Frontenac, though I can't remember if they actually stayed there.

Other than books, just CDs and DVDs. My mother used to like miniature sugar & creamer sets so each year in England we'd bring back a new one for her. We were supposed to inherit them but we don't really have a place to put them so we let my sister (who wanted everything anyway) have them.

Jeff M.

Deb said...

Jeff--I sense there's a whole family saga contained in your last sentence!

pattinase (abbott) said...

We are not so far away, Brian. And I wanted to say this was clearly the house of people from somewhere else. It looked like nothing had been improved or remodeled since 1938, when they moved in. And the pictures were of pre-war children. A real treasure trove on many levels.
We like to collect local artists too, George.
Ha, Jeff. Have you ever read THE GRAB.

Richard said...

Patti, you could go to a art/framing store that has simple ready to go frames, maybe thin block ones, and pre-cut mats and assemble them (put the mat and picture in the frame) yourself. We often do that with things that aren't worth a full framing job. They still look great. We use Aaron Bros. but they may be a western Co

pattinase (abbott) said...

Will probably at least price it out. A shame to have them moldering away.

Richard said...

If I'd read the comments first, I could have just said "what Deb said".

Anonymous said...

Deb & Patti - yes. I have read THE GRAB and thought of it often. My sister did not even show up at my father's funeral. (Considering the scene she would have made this may have been for the best.) Yet for years we've all known she wanted everything, including things that were promised to the rest of us. At various times over the years she was cut out of the will by one or both of my parents but she was back in (mainly because of her children, I'd guess) at the end.

My other sister is the one who has had to bear the brunt of dealing with her as she is the one on scene. Frankly, there were very few things we wanted so did not care.

Jeff M.

pattinase (abbott) said...

I always wonder how these people rationalize such behavior. Very sad.