Friday, January 16, 2015

Friday's Forgotten Books, Friday, January 16, 2015

 Now that I am on Pacific Time, this will probably come up late. Sorry.


THE SLAVES OF SOLITUDE, Patrick Hamilton

I loved this book. but I am not sure how many of you would. It is quiet, slow. and lethally wicked in its depiction of life in a boarding house well outside London during World War II. Miss Roach, our central character, is driven from her job (teaching) and her home (London) due to the blitz and takes refuge here. She becomes the victim of a very nasty, albeit rather hapless man, a lothario U.S. soldier, and a would-be female friend. The writing is just so on the mark--a bit like Anita Brookner or Barbara Pym but a bit more acerbic. Miss Roach's trials last for most of the book, but in the end, she triumphs.

Mark Baker, THE BLACK ECHO, Michael Connelly
Joe Barone, THE GOSPEL ACCORDING TO JESUS CHRIST, Jose Saramago
Brian Busby, DAUGHTERS OF DESIRE, Fletcher Knight
Bill Crider, A CENTURY OF FANTASY, 1980-89, ed. Robert Silverberg
Martin Edwards, DEADLIER THAN THE MALE, Jessica Mann
Curt Evans, WAS CONNIE'S MURDER CLUED, THE DETECTION CLUB
Ray Garraty, SOMEBODY OWES ME MONEY, Donald Westlake
Rick Horton, COLLECTED SHORT STORIES, Kingsley Amis
Jerry House, THE MAGAZINE OF FANTASY AND SCIENCE FICTION, 1950
Randy Johnson, TOKEN OF REMORSE, Michael Stone
George Kelley, THE RISEN EMPIRE and THE KILLER OF WORLDS, Scott Westerfield
Margot Kinberg, JUST ANOTHER ANGEL, Michael Ripley
Rob Kitchin, RED BONES, Ann Cleeves
B. V. Lawson, MURDER ON THE RUN, The Round Table
Evan Lewis, TOO MANY MAVERICKS, James A. Lawson
Steve Lewis/William Deeck, CATS DON'T SMILE, D.B. Olsen
Todd Mason
J.F. Norris, THE OFFICIIAL CHAPERONE, Natalie Sumner Lincoln
Juri Nummelin, THE STRAW MEN, Michael Marshal
Graham Powell. 101 YEARS' ENTERTAINMENT, ed. Ellery Queen
James Reasoner, THE SUCKER, Orrie Hitt
Richard Robinson, ROMAN BLOOD, Stephen Saylor
Gerard Saylor, THE TREATMENT, Mo Hayder
Ron Scheer, LIVING ON JACKS AND QUEENS, ed. Robert J. Randisi
R.T., FALLING MAN, Don Delillo
Kevin Tipple/Barry Ergang, MASTERS OF NOIR, vol 1
TracyK , THIRTY-NINE STEPS, John Buchan
Prashant Trikannad, THE SECRET SENSE, Issac Asimov

12 comments:

R.T. said...

Patti, there is this from Beyond Eastrod -- this week's installment in a weekly feature -- if you would like to include it in your weekly FFB:

http://beyondeastrod.blogspot.com/2015/01/unforgettable-book-friday-don-delillos.html

All the best from a long time follower of your blog . . . R.T.

Richard said...

Patti, it appears you left the link off my listing. Do you want me to send it again?

Richard said...

Thanks!

Jerry House said...

I just put mine up, Patti. A review of the Winter-Spring 1950 issue of THE MAGAZINE OF FANTASY & SCIENCE FICTION.

Charles Gramlich said...

Sometimes I like to read those character studies. I love that title too, the slaves of solitude.

Jeffrey Meyerson said...

I think this is the smallest number of books I've ever read on one of these weekly lists - only 3.

Jeff M.

Prashant C. Trikannad said...

Thank you, Patti.

BV Lawson said...

Patti, my link is up:

http://inreferencetomurder.typepad.com/my_weblog/2015/01/ffb-murder-on-the-run.html

Wish Typepad didn't make it so easy to put "PM" instead of "AM" in the date/time when it came to scheduling these posts....

TracyK said...

The Slaves of Solitude sounds very good. I like books set during WWII; I will seek it out. (And thanks for including my review.)

Deb said...

Patrick Hamilton's Twenty Thousand Streets Under the Stars (a trilogy, involving a man who falls in love with a prostitute), set in London in the 1920s, is excellent, albeit rather downbeat.

Ray Garraty said...

http://longwalkwithbooks.blogspot.com/2015/01/somebody-owes-me-money.html

my review is up

Margot Kinberg said...

Thanks as ever for including my post, Patti :-)