Monday, February 23, 2009

MC5 Doing Ramblin Rose/John Lennon's John Sinclair Song

And the chick at the beginning is the best reminder of the sixties I've had in a longggggggggg time. Don't pass her up if you want to know what it was like. Or remember.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6Cg0qJ-ieRk

And for John Lennon and Yoko's song http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fZJLInCgem8

24 comments:

Bill Crider said...

Far out!

Randy Johnson said...

Ah yes, those sixties. That was my era as well.
It reminds me of a time a buddy and I attended a Grateful Dead concert about ten years back. As we walked through the parking lot, he looked at me and wondered if we had walked through a time warp.
Everywhere you looked, there were Volkswagen vans, women with long straight hair and wearing beads dancing barefoot. Not to mention that smell of burning "weed" in the air. It could definitely have been the sixties.

pattinase (abbott) said...

Groovy.
I wish I had been there, Randy. I'd like to go somewhere with no ipods, texting or similar stuff. Of course I know my parents hated all the things you listed.

Todd Mason said...

And, of course, the MC5 collaborated with Philly's own (by the 1960s) Sun Ra Arkestra, covering each other's work. It's a serious vibe, Patti. And not your parents' jazz nor rock.

(Space is the place...rama lama fa fa fa.)

pattinase (abbott) said...

I think I stopped listening to rock at an earlier age than anyone on the planet. Being a professor's wife at 22, warped my musical soul. I thought I was supposed to listen to classical music, play bridge and go to teas.

debra said...

These are great, Patti. Far out, right on and all that. I'll be sure to pull my car up to the house and get an extension cord.....

pattinase (abbott) said...

Isn't that the funnies thing ever? I didn't know FM was still rare by the late sixties.

Todd Mason said...

Rare might be an overstatement, but "big-time" radio was still almost all on AM, leaving the FM band largely to public radio (Pacifica, NPR, etc.) and relatively experimental commercial radio (as well as jazz, classical, and *gag* Easy Listening of the Mantovani and 101 Strings sort).

pattinase (abbott) said...

Remember when commercials on FM were rare. Those were the days, my friend.

Anonymous said...

I think the MC5's "Kick Out The Jams" is one of the greatest rock n'roll tunes of all time. I'm partial to the live uncensored version which I think was recorded at the Grande Ballroom in Detroit back in '68.
John McAuley

pattinase (abbott) said...

Thanks, John. I'll check it out.

Todd Mason said...

It'd be harder to find the censored version these days! Patti, you haven't heard KICK OUT THE JAMS yet? Oh, my.

pattinase (abbott) said...

I think I missed the sixties somehow. Or at least the MC5 sixties. I was listening to Karl Haas and trying to understand the difference between concertos and sonatas.

Anonymous said...

Patti: Jeez-- Wised you up to Rory Gallagher's A Million Miles Away, gave you a coincidental memory nudge to peruse Ginsberg's Howl and now I find out you've never heard the MC5's Kick Out The Jams. I mean it's the M.C.5!! [Motor City 5] If you cop to never having heard of Iggy And The Stooges I don't know what the hell I'm gonna' do.
[b.t.w of coincidence--last month I finished a flash piece that begins with the MC5 playing at the Grande Ballroom so I've been listening to Kick Out The Jams and some of the bands other tracks quite a bit lately.]
John McAuley

Todd Mason said...

I was happily later enough on that I had no cogniitve dissonance in appreciating Varese's, the punks' and the free jazz folks dissonance. ADVENTURES IN GOOD MUSIC was a fine show, just not the only source for good music! It probably helped that my folks had a record collection that ranged from classical to early rock to comedy to a bit of 1960s discoteque music (cha-chas and such), and Johnny Cash and such were around to help fill out the education in a few more directions...

Todd Mason said...

Suffice it to say that "Ramblin' Rose" is one of the weaker tracks on KICK OUT THE JAMS. That might give you some idea. (And "rama lama fa fa fa" is what they reduce the lyrics of "Rocket Reducer No. 5" to, and you won't mind at all.)

Steve Oerkfitz said...

The Tartar Field concert. Wow-I was there.Probably saw the MC5 about 50 times. They were a great live band. too bad their recordings never did them justice. Their first/live album was their best.

pattinase (abbott) said...

Do I get any leaveway since I didn't move to Detroit until 1970? I will spend tomorrow at work listening to MC5 and remedying my awful education.
My parents only listened to Big Band music and that on the radio. Didn't even have a record player. I come from a musically deprived background although they could both dance like the people on that reality show.

Anonymous said...

Patti: Regarding big band music, one of my favorite albums is In The Digital Mood by The Glenn Miller Orchestra. I highly recommend it. Now about my favorite Led Zeppelin, AC/DC, Tom Waits albums...

And an fyi- on the uncensored version the first five words are "Kick out the jams motherf*&^$%s" so you might not want to sing along with it at work tomorrow.

John McAuley

Charles Gramlich said...

MC5 could rock.

pattinase (abbott) said...

Since I never understand what the lyrics are on heavy rock songs, there's little danger. Off I go.
I was definitely more a Mama and the Papas girl.

Todd Mason said...

YouTube, at least, appears only to have the censored live recordings of "Kick Out the Jams" that are far less effective than the version recorded and mixed competently for the KICK OUT THE JAMS album. And by 1970, the MC5 was already starting to lose its way...and Karl Haas would never have approved anyway.

As noted, the MC5 weren't usually all that worried about lyrics except as more urgent-sounding tools, even if "The girls can't stand it if you do it right" (which we more enlightened sorts have been known to recast as "No one can stand it if you do it right").

Todd Mason said...

And the Mamas and the Papas could sure pack some twisted psychology into those sweet tones.

pattinase (abbott) said...

It's painfully clear I've lost my ear for this music--if indeed I ever had it. But as with my advice to my children on learning to eat a new food, try it six times before rejecting it.