Friday, April 07, 2017

Friday's Forgotten Books, April 7, 2017


NEXT WEEK: SMALLTOWN COPS AND SHERIFFS

Love and War in the Apennines by Eric Newby (reviewed by Chris Ewan)

Eric Newby’s brilliant fictional memoir, Love and War in the Apennines, is the standout title from a classy collection of travel fiction. It tells the story of Newby’s war years, opening with his capture as part of a doomed Special Boat Section mission off the east coast of Sicily and touching on his internment in a prison camp close to Parma.
If that sounds like the ingredients for a bleak tale, rest assured that this whimsical story is anything but. Part of that has to do with Newby’s gentle humour – at times he comes across as a P.G. Wodehouse character - but two things really set his tale apart.
The first is that following the Italian Armistice in 1943, Newby and his fellow prisoners evaded the advancing Germans and took shelter in the mountains and countryside south of the River Po. Here, Newby was hidden, cared for and fed by a motley network of local peasants and farmers, passed from one precarious location to the next, eventually ending up in a mountain cave.
His saviours come vividly to life, described with real affection and wit, as do the high mountain peaks, the simple Italian food, the colourful morning skies and all that other good stuff that comes from a neat piece of travel writing.
But what really tugs at the heart is the developing romance between Newby and a local girl called Wanda. Communicating in pigeon English and Italian, chaperoned by nuns, separated by mountain passes and the dangers of the war, they fall swiftly in love, destined to spend the rest of their lives together.
It’s sentimental, sure, and Newby is the first to admit that the lines between fact and fiction are more than a little blurred. But even so, it’s strangely poignant to read of how cut-off Newby became from any larger knowledge of the conflict raging all around him, and I defy anyone to read the epilogue, set some twelve years after the end of Newby’s ordeal, without a lump in the throat.

Yvette Banek, HARE SITTING UP, Michael Innes
Joe Barone, A TEST OF WILLS, Charles Todd
Elgin Bleecker, THE JAMES DEANS, Reed Farrel Coleman
Brian Busby, MORT DE THOMAS D'ARCY MCGEE
Bill Crider, THE TAMING OF CARNEY WILDE, Bart Spicer
Martin Edwards, INSPECTOR FRENCH AND THE STARVEL TRAGEDY, Freeman Wills Crofts
Curt Evans, MURDER AT MIDYEARS, Marion Mainwaring
Elisabeth Grace Foley, THE RHODES READER, Eugene Manlove Rhodes
Richard Horton, PENROD, Booth Tarkington
Jerry House, SPLIT IMAGE, Robert B. Parker
George Kelley, THE NIGHT OCEAN, Paul LeFarge
Margot Kinberg, PEEPSHOW, Leigh Redhead
B.V. Lawson, MURDER IN JAPAN AND DANGER IN D.C., Martin Greenberg
Evan Lewis, 12 Chinamen and a Woman, James Hadley Chase
Steve Lewis, BOSTON BLACKIE, Jack Boyle
Todd Mason THE EIGHTH STAGE OF FANDOM, Robert Bloch
J.F. Norris, THE DETECTIVE NOVELS OF FRANCIS DUNCAN, Mordecai Tremayne
Matt Paust, AT PLAY IN THE FIELDS OF THE LORD, Peter Matthiessen
James Reasoner, PULP FICTION, Robert Turner
Gerard Saylor, THE FADEOUT, ACT THREE, Brubaker and Phillips
TomCat, FIVE MATCHBOXES, John Russell Fearn
TracyK, ALL THE LONELY PEOPLE, Martin Edwards

7 comments:

Jeffrey Meyerson said...

I discovered Newby with the fascinating THE LAST GRAIN RACE, and then went back and read a few of his others, including his later memoir, A TRAVELER'S LIFE, plus A SHORT WALK IN THE HINDU KUSH. Good stuff.

Elisabeth Grace Foley said...

Here's my entry: The Rhodes Reader by Eugene Manlove Rhodes.

J F Norris said...

Patti, could you alter my entry? You misunderstood the title of my post. Please change it to "The Detective Novels of Francis Duncan". My post focusses on a character in those books and discusses three books the character appears in.

Todd Mason said...

So is Newby's memoir lightly fictionalized? I guess I should Go Look. And that's a pidgn ItaliEnglish, rather than pigeon, no matter how much they might've been cooing.

Thanks, Patti. Has Blogspot been giving you any grief today? It sure has been acting slowly, and giving Google Our Servers Are Down messages to me.

Todd Mason said...

Or, even pidgin Italo-English, as that might read in English of a more common sort.

pattinase (abbott) said...

Much, much grief!

Yvette said...

I've had Eric Newby on my TBR list for a while. I must do something about getting his books. The HINDU KUSH one is very hard to find. My library has nothing Newby. But I will persevere.