Wednesday, February 21, 2018

What Has Everyone Been Reading?

Just finished LAIDLAW by William McIlvay. Now I am reading WOMEN IN THE WINDOW by A.J Finn. Have not exactly read up a storm here because I have doing publicity pieces for I BRING SORROW on this INFERNAL MAC. I lose half of what I write most days.

So what are you reading?

21 comments:

George said...

I'm reading Max Boot's THE ROAD NOT TAKEN: EDWARD LANSDALE AND THE AMERICAN TRAGEDY IN VIETNAM.

In the "on-deck circle" is THE LAST STAND by Mickey Spillane (his last navel).

pattinase (abbott) said...

Do you try and alternate fiction and non-fiction.

George said...

Yes, I alternated fiction and non-fiction. I also alternate novels and short story collections. Variety is the spice of Life!

Steve Oerkfitz said...

Just finished The Chalk Man by C.J. Tudor, The Twelve Deaths of Samuel Harper by Hannah Tinti and a collection of short stories by Christopher Rowe called Telling the Map. On deck the new Jane Harper- Force of Nature, the New Mick Herron- This Is What Happened and the new Yrsa Sigurdardottir-The Legacy-all, library books.

pattinase (abbott) said...

I have been meaning to try Sigurdardottir for years. What is your favorite?

Jeffrey Meyerson said...

I've been reading more non-fiction down here, for some reason. Currently reading THE STORY OF CLASSIC CRIME IN 100 BOOKS by Martin Edwards. This covers the first half of the 20th Century. Also Scott S. Greenberger"s THE UNEXPECTED PRESIDENT : THE LIFE AND TIMES OF CHESTER A. ARTHUR, which is quite interesting so far. I have another waiting when I finish this - SUNNY'S NIGHTS: LOST AND FOUND AT A BAR ON THE EDGE OF THE WORLD by Tim Sultan. The bar is in Red Hook, Brooklyn. I also read a couple of others - EVERYBODY LIES and THANK YOU FOR YOUR SERVICE.

Fiction. Currently reading CRASHED by Timothy Hallinan and a collection of stories originally published in 1912, THRILLING STORIES OF THE RAILWAY by Victor L. Whitechurch.

Al Tucher said...

I'm also in a nonfiction phase. I just read FANTASYLAND, by Kurt Andersen, and I'm about to get into THE DEMON-HAUNTED WORLD, by Carl Sagan. Both deal with the prevalence of nonsense.

Gerard Saylor said...

THRILLING STORIES OF THE RAILWAY sounds interesting.

I joined an online book club my alma mater started. I never participate in the book discussion but checked out the audio version of JUT MERCY by Bryan Stevenson. Stevenson helped out with a death row case in law school and moved to Georgia and Alabama to defend those cases. The main case is of a defendant with poor representation and a Sheriff's Office and DA desperate to find and convict a killer. The case was in the late '80s and I sure hope the courts and race relations have gotten better.

I ordered a copy of a Harold Pinter play after hearing his name on the radio. The DJ was talking about the film GO-BETWEEN and saying Pinter's name in a way that made me think everyone but me knew who Pinter was.

Dana King said...

I finished Dennis Lehane's THE GIVEN DAY Monday night. Started ALL THE PIECES MATTER (The oral history of THE WIRE). THE GIVEN DAY might be the best book I ever read, and PIECES has me hooked.

pattinase (abbott) said...

I just told Phil he needed to get that book, Dana. Maybe I read your discussion on your blog.
I have seen some Pinter. At a discussion before the RHINOCEROS she grouped Pinter with Ionesco and Beckett but i never thought of him like that.
Jeff-Do you read mostly outside down here? We sit by the pool and read.
The prevalence of nonsense. That pretty much sums it up.

Jeffrey Meyerson said...

Gerard, you can get the Kindle edition of the Whitechurch book on Amazon for 99 cents, or a paperback for $6.99. The edition I have doesn't currently seem to be available on Kindle so I can't remember what I paid, but it has a second series of railway stories, making it 28 total, plus a novel , THE CRIME AT DIANA'S POOL.

I read inside on the couch, outside on the patio next to the pool (you have to avoid the sun because it is hot and humid now), occasionally in Starbucks. There is a table by the pool with a big umbrella for protection where Jackie prefers to read. She reads the Kindle in bed when I go to sleep.

Rick Robinson said...

Read Chester Himes' COTTON COMES TO HARLEM, which was good, but not what I expected. Also reading SEMIOSIS by Sue Burke. It's the first science fiction I've read in 6 or 8 months, but it just came out and the reviews were quite positive. So far I'm enjoying it.

Next up are ORIGINS, the newest of Dan Brown's Langdon novels (I didn't read the last couple), HARDER GROUND, Woods Cop short stories by Joseph Heywood. I really liked the first collection, HARD GROUND, but have been waiting to read this for "the right time". I'm also waiting for THE DRY to come from the library.

pattinase (abbott) said...

THE DRY was terrific. Looking forward to the new one.

Jeffrey Meyerson said...

Rick, I really enjoyed both Woods Cop collections.

TracyK said...

Currently reading RED SPARROW by Jason Matthews because I like spy fiction and the movie is coming out soon. I won't see it in the theatER but still don't want to hear about the story before I read it.

Before that MURDER BEGINS AT HOME by Delano Ames, and before that LOVE & TREASURE by Ayelet Waldman.

Jerry House said...

I've been on a graphic novel kick since I found the first seven volumes of Brian K. Vaughan & Fiona Staples SAGA at the library, which I just finished. Fabulous stuff.

In the chute are Sarah Pinsborough's BEHIND HER EYES, F. Paul Wilson's THE GOD GENE, and Donald E. Westlake's THE COMEDY IS FINISHED. I'm also in the mood for some 19th/early 20th century stuff so I may dip into THRILLING STORIES OF THE RAILWAY, something I've been thinking of doing for a while.

pattinase (abbott) said...

Have never been able to work my way into graphic novels. Something about the way the dialog is scattered on the page. Liked the Pinsborough.
Will have to recommend Red Sparrow to Phil He's been looking for a good spy novel.

Charles Gramlich said...

Putting up a blog today on how much I've been enjoying Harlan Coben

TracyK said...

Regarding RED SPARROW, the book is more violent and gritty (and sexy) in some areas than I am used to in spy fiction, but... I can't stop reading it at night, so I am really enjoying it. The characters are well done.

Gerard Saylor said...

Re: RED SPARROW. Great. One more thing to add. Like I don't already have a stack of stuff sitting at home.

pattinase (abbott) said...

Thanks!