Thursday, September 18, 2008

ALA Banned Books Week


It has been suggested to me by Andi Shechter that on Friday, October 3rd, we review banned books on this site.

The American Library Association has named the entire week banned books week. Here's the site: http://www.ala.org/ala/oif/bannedbooksweek/bannedbooksweek.cfm
You will find many lists of books there that groups or individuals have attempted to ban over the last few centuries.

Karen Olson at First Offenders has also asked FOFO to "adopt" one of these books and talk about it.

So joining along with the Andi, the ALA and Karen, please consider writing about a banned book on October 3rd. It might be helpful to include a line or two about what the objection to the book might have been. I'll post reviews here or links to your site if you let me know you'll have one.

Banned books have been in the news a lot recently. Maybe it's time to take a look. Since I already read one for FO, I'll take the Alice books, a YA series by Phyllis Reynolds Naylor.

6 comments:

Patti O said...

Hey, Patti, I tagged you on my blog
--you're "It"!
http://pattispenandpicks.blogspot.com/

Jen said...

Hi Patti, I would love to post for Banned Books Week - would To Kill a Mockingbird be o.k? I think it is still among the most commonly challenged books these days. It still boggles my mind that people think they have the right to censor like that, though...

pattinase (abbott) said...

Terrific, Jen. Just read it in my bookclub and it still packs a punch. One of the worst books to go after--ever.

Barbara Martin said...

I remember when "Lady Chatterly's Lover" was considered a banned book, all because she had an affair with the groundskeeper, a man much below her station. D. H. Lawrence's other books show depth in human relationships.

pattinase (abbott) said...

Barbara-consider doing a piece on it for October 3.

Barbara Martin said...

Yes, I'll do a piece on Lady Chatterly's Lover. Now, I have to go find a copy.